Orangutan ‘left suicidal’ after his mother was killed

Heartbreaking, the sadness in his eyes.

Metro

A veterinary team from International Animal Rescue is fighting for the life of a baby orangutan in Borneo so traumatised by the loss of his mother, and being snatched from the forest, that he completely lost the will to live.   Udin, a tiny baby of only a few months old, was almost certainly clinging to his mother when she was shot or hacked down with a machete while trying to protect her infant. He was probably torn from her warm body before being sold as a pet to a local farmer. The ordeal had a severe effect on the little orangutanís health. He was kept locked up and alone in a small, dark cage ñ a terrifying experience for a young animal that would normally depend on his mother for comfort and protection during the first years of his life. When he arrived at the IAR Orangutan Centre in Borneo Udin showed no interest in his surroundings and turned away from the rescuers trying to save his life. He was severely malnourished and dehydrated but had no desire to eat, to drink or to live. His mind and body were detaching from the world around him. Pictures released today by International Animal Rescue shows the team comforting and caring for Udin shortly after his rescue:  Vet nurse Sara has described how Udin literally ìtried to die several times, but we wouldnít let him and just kept interacting with him and doing lots of physiotherapy and exercises so he could not ignore us and had to learn to trust us as his sole link to survival. Eventually, after around ten days, he turned a corner. He started to respond to us and show an interest in food. Finally there was a glimmer of light in his sad dark eyes.î  Although his condition is more stable, Udin still requires constant care and intensive medical treatment.  Alan Knight, IAR Chief Executive, said: ìThe vets are doing everything they can to give Udin the best chance of survival. From the moment he was rescued, members of the team have stayed with him round-the-clock and still sleep on the floor beside him so that they can comfort and console him during the dark hours of the night. He clings constantly to a large fluffy teddy bear, just as he would have clung to his mother in the wild.î International Animal Rescue is keen to emphasise that Udinís story is not an isolated case. ìWe have 86 orangutans in our rehabilitation center, all with stories as heartbreaking as Udinís,î said Knight. ìWhat makes his case particularly poignant however is the fact that he had suffered so much that he had completely given up on life. By the time we rescued him his mind and body were shutting down. But our medical team refused to give up on him and slowly they are winning the battle to save him.î ìUdin still faces a long road ahead but at least now we all dare hope that eventually he will recover. Baby orangutans are extremely vulnerable to sickness and disease, particularly when they have suffered a very poor start in life. The next few weeks will be a critical time in Udinís recovery. The condition of a baby like him can literally change overnight but we will be monitoring his progress closely for any signs of deterioration in his health.î Featuring: You can help nurse Udin back to help by donating. For further info: info@internationalanimalrescue.org Where: Borneo, Indonesia When: 30 Jul 2015 Credit: Supplied by WENN.com **WENN does not claim any ownership including but not limited to Copyright, License in attached material. Fees charged by WENN are for WENN's services only, do not, nor are they intended to, convey to the user any ownership of Copyright, License in material. By publishing this material you expressly agree to indemnify, to hold WENN, its directors, shareholders, employees harmless from any loss, claims, damages, demands, expenses (including legal fees), any causes of action, allegation against WENN arising out of, connected in any way with publication of the material.** Baby orangutan Udin (Pic: Wenn)

Newborn orangutan Udin may be young, but he’s already lived a horrific life.

Worried rescuers say the cute animal has ‘tried to die several times’ after his mother was killed.

It is likely his mum was shot or stabbed as she tried to protect him.

[metro-link url=”http://metro.co.uk/2015/05/02/watch-tv-presenter-get-hit-around-the-head-by-cute-baby-orangutan-5177745/” title=”Watch TV presenter get hit around the head by cute baby orangutan”]

[metro-link url=”http://metro.co.uk/2015/07/27/this-young-orangutan-was-put-in-the-naughty-corner-after-escaping-her-enclosure-5314325/” title=”This young orangutan was put in the naughty corner after escaping her enclosure”]

After her death, Udin was sold to a farmer, who kept him as a pet – and locked him up in a small cage.

When the traumatised orphan was rushed by the International Animal Rescue team to the IAR Orangutan Centre in Borneo, he would not eat or drink, and apparently showed no interest in his surroundings.

A veterinary team from International Animal Rescue is fighting for the life of a baby orangutan in Borneo so traumatised by the loss of his mother, and being snatched from the forest, that he completely lost the will to live.   Udin, a tiny baby of only a few months old, was almost certainly clinging to his mother when she was shot or hacked down with a machete while trying to protect her infant. He was probably torn from her warm body before being sold as a pet to a local farmer. The ordeal had a severe effect on the little orangutanís health. He was kept locked up and alone in a small, dark cage ñ a terrifying experience for a young animal that would normally depend on his mother for comfort and protection during the first years of his life. When he arrived at the IAR Orangutan Centre in Borneo Udin showed no interest in his surroundings and turned away from the rescuers trying to save his life. He was severely malnourished and dehydrated but had no desire to eat, to drink or to live. His mind and body were detaching from the world around him. Pictures released today by International Animal Rescue shows the team comforting and caring for Udin shortly after his rescue:  Vet nurse Sara has described how Udin literally ìtried to die several times, but we wouldnít let him and just kept interacting with him and doing lots of physiotherapy and exercises so he could not ignore us and had to learn to trust us as his sole link to survival. Eventually, after around ten days, he turned a corner. He started to respond to us and show an interest in food. Finally there was a glimmer of light in his sad dark eyes.î  Although his condition is more stable, Udin still requires constant care and intensive medical treatment.  Alan Knight, IAR Chief Executive, said: ìThe vets are doing everything they can to give Udin the best chance of survival. From the moment he was rescued, members of the team have stayed with him round-the-clock and still sleep on the floor beside him so that they can comfort and console him during the dark hours of the night. He clings constantly to a large fluffy teddy bear, just as he would have clung to his mother in the wild.î International Animal Rescue is keen to emphasise that Udinís story is not an isolated case. ìWe have 86 orangutans in our rehabilitation center, all with stories as heartbreaking as Udinís,î said Knight. ìWhat makes his case particularly poignant however is the fact that he had suffered so much that he had completely given up on life. By the time we rescued him his mind and body were shutting down. But our medical team refused to give up on him and slowly they are winning the battle to save him.î ìUdin still faces a long road ahead but at least now we all dare hope that eventually he will recover. Baby orangutans are extremely vulnerable to sickness and disease, particularly when they have suffered a very poor start in life. The next few weeks will be a critical time in Udinís recovery. The condition of a baby like him can literally change overnight but we will be monitoring his progress closely for any signs of deterioration in his health.î Featuring: Atmosphere Where: Borneo, Indonesia When: 30 Jul 2015 Credit: Supplied by WENN.com **WENN does not claim any ownership including but not limited to Copyright, License in attached material. Fees charged by WENN are for WENN's services only, do not, nor are they intended to, convey to the user any ownership of Copyright, License in material. By publishing this material you expressly agree to indemnify, to hold WENN, its directors, shareholders, employees harmless from any loss, claims, damages, demands, expenses (including legal fees), any causes of action, allegation against WENN arising out of, connected in any way with publication of the material.** Sad baby Udin (Pic: Wenn)

Vets are now sleeping next to him, trying to comfort…

View original post 112 more words

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s